Wednesday, 27 April 2011

Sahara's Supplies


Look at what I just received in the mail!

I had been contacted out of the blue by Jamie at http://saharassoapmakingsupplies.blogspot.com/ and she offered me some Mica to play with and blog about. Yippee! I love the recipes she posts on her blog.

My mind is whirling with the possibilities!! I am thinking about trying out the spoon swirling that Ka fée http://soapsession.com/blog/2011/04/07/recette-du-savon-spoon-swirl/ and then Soaperstar blogged about... http://soaperstar.blogspot.com/2011/04/adam-eve.html

I have never used Mica before. Any advice?

Will post as soon as I have played......

xo
Jen

19 comments:

Briny Bar Soap said...

OOooOOoo how exciting...

I haven't really played around with micas much, or any colorants for that matter, but when I do I prefer mixing them with the oil until they are completely incorporated. That way the soap does reach a thick trace before all the little balls of colorant have been broken up. I have also tried putting colorant in with the superfatting oil. That has seemed to work well too.

What's the difference between mica and oxides/other colorants? Because I have no idea...

Celine Blacow said...

Two things I'd say - 1. Mix your choice of mica up with a little of the oil for your soaps, to break up any lumps. It mixes beautifully. And 2. Make sure the mica you use is soap stable - some micas will change colours when used in soap, some don't. I don't know if you were sent soap stable ones but worth checking ... or have fun wondering what colour it'll turn!!!

Have fun and how lovely to be offered the micas to test out too! Enjoy!

Tierra Verde Handmade Soap said...

Jen,I don't work with mica's I have used them a few times and from what I can remember it takes quite a bit to get the color your are expecting - so just keep that in mind when you are trying to achieve the color you want.
Good luck and have fun!

Splurge Sisters said...

Celine is right on but make sure you don't add too much oil to your mica (ask me how I know :( You just need enough oil to mix it well. I look forward to your results and mica is addictive.

Jennifer Young said...

Briny Bar... Thank you. I haven't worked with Oxides as I understand they are not natural. I believe their origin was but basically now they are tampered with. As for Micas, I am not really sure. I don't think they are entirely natural as well... but I will need to investigate more. I usually work with Clays, Charcoal, Alkanet, Ratanjot, Annatto, Orange Tissue Oil, spirulina, Cinnamon, Cocoa Powder, Coffee, Indigo... the natural colourants I can be sure about. xo Jen

Jennifer Young said...

Celine, Thanks for the tips! Your spoon swirl came out gorgeous!! xo Jen

Jennifer Young said...

Michelle, Thank you for the tip. I will have to research a little about how much to use... Do you know how "natural" micas are? I have a feeling that is is similar to Oxides... the origin was but now they are not? xo Jen

Jennifer Young said...

Splurge, Thank you also for the tip... just a little oil. I think as I will be doing some swirling, I will add it to some trace oil. Will let you know how it goes! xo Jen

flor da pele said...

Jen,
Precisei instalar o Firefox para acessar seu blog!

Tenho certeza que você fará maravilhas com a Mica.
Kisses from Brazil,
Sonia.

Jennifer Young said...

Sonia, Muchas gracias!!! Firefox? Que raro! Which do you understand better - English or Spanish? I don't speak any portuguese sorry.... xo Jen

sironasprings said...

You are right that oxide and ultramarines are not natural. They are chemically the same as the pigments that were once extracted from the Earth (minerals, rocks and such), but manufactured in a laboratory. In a way, they are better than using natural pigments because those can be contaminated with heavy metals (mercury, lead, etc). But still not natural. Mica is a colorless mineral that breaks off into flakes that are great at reflecting light, making them shiny. Colors (pigments or dyes usually) are then attached to them. So while the mica itself may be natural, the attached color is not. They are used not only in soap, but also mineral makeup.

Tierra Verde Handmade Soap said...

Jen,what Sirona Springs said - that is the perfect explanation of what mica's are.

Jennifer Young said...

Sirona Springs, Thank you so much. Now I finally understand better about Oxides and Micas!! xo Jen

Coco said...

Wow that spoon swirling is spectacular!

Have fun with your new goodies. Can´t wait to see the results!

Donna OShaughnessy said...

YOU PEOPLE ! I have a life, kids, grandkids, a farm, a writing career but since reading this blog all I can think about is making soap ! I just started soaping in Jan. but I am ready to sell the farm, the husband, my collection of Irish pottery (OK maybe not that) in order to make soap all day long. Is there a support group I can join. Preferably one with big pots full of lucious oils ?

Jennifer Young said...

Michell, Thank you for confirming about the micas! xo Jen

Jennifer Young said...

Julia, Thanks. I am excited about experimenting again!! xo Jen

Jennifer Young said...

Donna, Oh yes, totally addicted as you... I LOVE making soap!! Love your blog! xo Jen

sironasprings said...

Oh, Jen, you're welcome! -Ruth